This Week’s Hangout:: Season 3 Premier with Brian Timoney

Well as promised, season 3 of Hangouts with James Fee premiers tomorrow at 1pm PST. The last time Brian joined me we talked about portals but this time we’ll catch up on all the new spatial news from the past few months. The new broadcast time is going to be 1pm PST every Friday. As before, all the shows will be archived on YouTube and this blog.  Go to the Google Hangout event page to find out more.

 

U.S. Maps Based on Where Baseball Players Were Born

Just in time to enjoy during the League Championship Series, Slate a has new maps showcasing where baseball players were born:

Since 1900, the states where the most baseball players have been born are California, Pennsylvania, Illinois, New York, and Texas. The states with the least are Idaho, Montana, North Dakota, Wyoming, and Alaska. Here’s a map of America if we were to divide the country into 50 states with the same number of baseball players born in each:
Baseball State of Birth

Gooseland is an empty wasteland of frozen ballfields and broken dreams. I grew up in Trammellia which probably explains why I’m blogging about this map instead of being in it.

40 Maps That Explain the Internet

I have no idea what a map story or story map is but I do love maps. Timothly Lee over at Vox has compiled 40 maps that show the growth of the Internet since 1969.

The internet increasingly pervades our lives, delivering information to us no matter where we are. It takes a complex system of cables, servers, towers, and other infrastructure, developed over decades, to allow us to stay in touch with our friends and family so effortlessly. Here are 40 maps that will help you better understand the internet — where it came from, how it works, and how it’s used by people around the world.
ARAPNET 69

Nokia’s Here Auto Tries to Innovate

Nokia Logo

Interesting article on Engadget:

The latest version of Here Auto, launched at the Paris Auto Show, has very few rough edges. It’s designed to think ahead of you, learn your habits, work with other devices and present information and options in the least distracting way possible. That’s Nokia’s goal, anyway – to see if it succeeded, I took a tour around Paris in the company’s Range Rover demonstrator.

Self aware in car mapping. Sounds interesting but a demonstrator doesn’t mean care companies are going to jump on board. My 2014 Toyota 4Running has a completely out of date navigation system that I’m stuck with. Toyota seems to have signed deals with Yelp, Bing and Facebook to get POIs which I can’t decide is better or worse than just having a whole Nokia system. Apple and Google are getting car integration but they don’t seem to be doing any better than Nokia.

I suspect most of us will continue to use Google or Apple Maps in the car on our smartphone or tablets for naviagation. At least Siri talks through my bluetooth…